NEW YALE COLLEGES: ALUMNI, STUDENTS & FRIENDS SUPPORTING DIVERSITY AT YALE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY


In the spring of 2015, I began working with the team behind NewYaleColleges.com, an alumni-led campaign to push Yale University for diversity in the naming of the two new residential colleges being established in 2017. I created college shields for eight different possible namesakes, which celebrate their contributions to the Yale community while also working well with current school imagery. While none of the proposals derive from a familial coat of arms, as most of the current college shields do, each one does contain the same colors and similar graphic styles as the existing twelve shields.

BOLIN:
The Bolin shield highlights Jane Bolin’s commitment to justice for families and children. Hanging scales from an elm tree with visible roots illustrate how Bolin’s law education in New Haven started her incredible career in Domestic Relations Court.

BOUCHET:
The Bouchet shield stems from Edward Bouchet’s extensive studies at Yale. The elm leaves highlight his personal roots in New Haven and the colorful rays represent his work in geometrical optics.

CLOUD:
The Cloud shield highlights Henry Roe Cloud’s Native American heritage and his efforts in education reform. The iconic thunderbird comes directly from his clan on the Winnebago Reservation while the quills and open book speak to his commitment to expanding higher education opportunities to Native Americans.

GOODMAN:
The Goodman shield symbolizes Mary Goodman’s legacy at Yale. Ripples extending from the cross from the Divinity School shield represent how Goodman’s generous gift has created a lasting effect for theological students many generations later.

HOPPER:
The Hopper shield highlights both Grace Hopper’s illustrious career in the Navy as well as her amazing contribution to computer science. The bars at the top symbolize her invention of the first compiler to translate language into computer code; the anchor and star signify her rank as Rear Admiral; and the laurels represent her lifelong commitment to academia.

PICKENS:
The Pickens shield illustrates William Pickens’ work as an essayist, made possible by his mother’s work as a washerwoman. Two pen nibs balancing each other reference his efforts towards racial equality, while also representing his work as a writer.

WASSERMAN:
The Wasserman shield highlights Elga Wasserman’s effort to bring coeducation to Yale. The blue and green represent Yale College and Yale Law School; the balance of colors and laurel wreaths symbolize her commitment to gender equality in academia; and the pattern of hexagons across the top represents her personal study of organic chemistry.

WING:
The Wing shield derives from the Chinese character for “mutual,” to highlight Yung Wing’s efforts to bring mutual exchange between Yale and China. His travels between the two created many metaphorical bridges while requiring him to travel across literal harbors, as signified by the enclosure of white space by sections of dense pattern.

NEW YALE COLLEGES | SPRING 2015